Stratford diptych Seafoam Sculptural Drawing 1 | 31 Women | Whitney Modern

31 Women

Stratford diptych Seafoam Sculptural Drawing 1 - 31  Women

CARLA GOLDBERG: Stratford Panel 1 and 2 (diptych)

Sculptural Drawings, oil ink, enamel, resin on acrylic panels  
36 x 36 in

Carla Goldberg always knew she would be an artist and blames it on a Bugs Bunny episode where Bugs is running away from a big red furry monster and then blends into the background dressed as a French artist. She remembers wanting to be an artist from that moment on and begging her grandmother for paints, canvas, a French beret, smock, and art classes. Her grandmother took her to the only art class she could find: an adult painting class two bus transfers away at the Palm Springs WMCA. Goldberg says, “she convinced them to let me in at 4—I behaved when I had a paintbrush in hand.” Goldberg later studied art at University of Redlands, Johnston Center for Integrative Studies and graduated with Honors. For her, it was the beginning of a lifetime of chasing ideas and experimenting. She went on to earn her MFA from MICA Mount Royal School of Art where experimentation was emphasized. Today, rather than Bugs Bunny, women artists like Yayoi Kusama and her polka dot infinity work inspire Carla Goldberg. Likewise, Goldberg’s own seafoam drawings are comprised of hundreds of thousands of micro polka dots. She appreciates Helen Frankenthaler for her innovative stain paintings process, since Goldberg also uses a lot of stains and pooling of paint. She feels a connection to Agnes Martin’s minimalist paintings, which to Goldberg are tiny lines of humanity. She sees pattern, texture and light in Martin’s work and finds this similarly in her own work. Carla Goldberg tends to be most influenced by the artists around her currently making art. It’s the comradery and community that has grown between herself and fellow artists (mostly women) that nourish her practice, from conversations or sharing information, to discoveries and just bouncing off ideas. Goldberg says “It’s important to have community and a sense of camaraderie.”

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